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 Australia and Indonesia: 10 years after Bali

 1/11/2012

 

Australia and Indonesia: 10 years after Bali

Australia and Indonesia: 10 years after Bali

 

Monash University recently hosted an international conference on the lessons learnt in the 10 years since the Bali nightclub bombings, which claimed the lives of 202 people in October 2002.

'Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Australia and Indonesia: 10 years after Bali' was organised by the University’s Global Terrorism Research Centre (GTReC) as part of its ongoing Linkage Project on Radicalisation, funded by the Australian Government through the Australian Research Council.

Kate Barrelle from GTReC  discussing ways to measure disengagement from radical ideologies
Kate Barrelle from GTReC discussing ways to measure disengagement from radical ideologies

While the discussions centred on the subjects of terrorism and counter-terrorism, issues of disengagement from extremism and deradicalisation were also a major focus of the three-day conference.  Local and international representatives from government, law enforcement and academia discussed the successes of the Countering Violent Extremism program and other counter-radicalisation initiatives around the world.

Prof. Pete Lentini and panel  members Mark Duckworth, Shane Patton and Brendan Money
Prof. Pete Lentini and panel members Mark Duckworth, Shane Patton and Brendan Money

Mr Bill Paterson, Australia’s Ambassador for Counter-Terrorism, was invited to address the conference.  In discussing the challenges that lie ahead for Australia and its neighbours, Mr Paterson stressed the need for cooperation between governments to prevent terrorism and promote counter-radicalisation in the long-term.

“No single approach, nor any single arm of government, or single government, can effectively deal with the issues raised by transnational terrorism. It requires wide collaboration at the local, national and international levels, and will require a sustained commitment over an extended period.”

Victoria Police Assistant  Commissioner Shane Patton addressing conference delegates
Victoria Police Assistant Commissioner Shane Patton addressing conference delegates

The event brought together speakers from Australia, the United Kingdom, Indonesia, the United States, Singapore and the Netherlands. Speakers included:

  • Assistant Commissioner Steve Lancaster APM, National Manager Counter Terrorism, Australian Federal Police
  • Professor Peter Neumann, Director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, King’s College London
  • Muhammad Zarkasih, Special Detachment 88 - Anti-Terror, Indonesian National Police
  • Professor Greg Barton, Global Terrorism Research Centre, Monash University
  • Deputy Commissioner Graham Ashton, Crime and Operations Support, Victoria Police
  • Tony Sheehan, Deputy Secretary - National Security & Criminal Justice Group, Attorney-General's Department

During his keynote address, Mr Sheehan noted the Australian Government’s ongoing commitment to working with communities to counter violent extremism.

“We at the Attorney-General’s Department, together with our portfolio agencies, are working to build stronger, more resilient communities, reduce the vulnerability of individuals to radicalisation, and challenge violent extremist ideologies”, he said.

“Our countering violent extremism strategy aims to reduce the number of individuals in Australia that hold extremist views, as well as reduce the number who are moving towards a willingness to use or actively support the use of violence.”

Bill  Paterson and Tony Sheehan answer questions from the floor at the conference
Bill Paterson and Tony Sheehan answer questions from the floor at the conference

For more information on this event, visit the ARC Linkage Project on Radicalisation website.